Seems, even the Gods have been affected by Narendra Modi’s demonetisation policy. People have been standing in long queues only to withdraw Rs 2,500 from their bank accounts as per the government’s policy.

While many people have deposited the old currency, a lot of them have still not mustered the courage to stand in the bank queues. They are delaying that dreaded trip to the banks until the time they have the last penny of the legal tender in hand.

Daily wage workers, tea stall owners and basically all those people who do not accept cards are among the worst hit by demonetisation.

But what about God. Worst hit or a beneficiary? Well, it’s debatable.

With a crunch of Rs 100 notes in the market, most people are resorting to using the change that was often even not paid attention to. The coins of Rs 1, Rs 2. Rs 5, Rs 10, or the Rs 20, Rs 50 notes are now the most sought after.

Till now, this was the currency that people used in temples to offer donations in the “daan patra”. But with a shortage of readily available change, the clinking of coins cannot be heard in the temples or gurudwaras, mosques and other religious places.

Not just as donations, people need easy change to buy the sweets or even garlands, coconut and other things that are offered as prasad. But they have none or have it just in a limited amount. And not all are willing to shed the much-wanted currency that they have by donating it. These donations in the lower denominations have certainly dropped.

Some reports suggest that the income of temples has come down by 20 per cent after the demonetisation announcement. Despite having seen an increase in pilgrims in the holy month of Kartik, the temples are experiencing a decrease in donations.

Also, many religious places are opening their donation boxes for people to lend them to meet their daily needs and to save them from getting stuck in a cash crunch situation.

So is God the worst hit?

Not really. Narendra Modi, in his grand announcement as well as the Reserve Bank of India in its subsequent press conferences, said that trusts at various religious places can accept the old Rs 500 and Rs 1000 notes.

After the announcement, several people who had loads of currency in hand submitted it at these religious places to avoid giving an account for this money.

Not just people who were hoarding money, even those who have genuine cash in hand are offering notes of higher denomination generously to save the lower denomination currency which can be used for daily expenses like food, travel, and medicine.

According to reports, some temples are seeing a sudden surge in donations that are being offered.

So yes, the currency in the lower denomination is in dearth in these religious places, but the higher denomination notes are making up for the losses incurred.

In fact, some supporters of the demonetisation policy are even ready to share it with our politicians who are standing the long queues outside the ATMs.

PS: Most people are happy that the priests and pondas who often ask for extremely high prices for their services are now running away from the Rs 1000 and Rs 500 notes and are even settling for donations as low as Rs 10.