The world has been witnessing Apple vs Samsung battle for quite some time now. Thanks to the ostentatious display of technological innovations by the two tech giants, the tech world has been divided into two halves– Apple fanboys and Samsung loyalists. The divide between the two groups is as pronounced as the rift between the Starks and the Lannisters, only, in this case, no one wants to be the ‘second best’.

While the world is busy fighting the Apple vs Samsung (and iOS vs Android) war, Merriam-Webster dictionary has a slightly different take on the matter. The dictionary last week gleefully tweeted that it had added the word ‘sheeple’ to its stock of over 4,70,000 entries to describe the people who are ‘docile, compliant or are easily influenced’.

While the word itself has been used to describe the people who walk in herds, it the first time that it has been acknowledged by the Merriam-Webster dictionary. However, it’s not the word but the example that the lexicon has used that has created a roar in the social media.

“Apple’s debuted a battery case for the juice-sucking iPhone—an ungainly lumpy case the sheeple will happily shell out $99 for”, the dictionary has written, citing an example of the usage.

This, as expected, has not gone well with the Apple users, who are taking it as a mark of disrespect.

Here’s what Twitter has to say about the dictionary’s bold voice: